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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 154 (some duplicates have been removed)
partnering of life science firms. today we'll start the clock on what we'll hope will be a longlar of collaboration between bay area and the most innovative companies in the area. before we introduce the first companies to occupy the area -- -- >> thank you, terry. i guess as everybody knows here, bayer has next year a history of 150 years' of successful r&d. i can assure everybody things have changed how we do r&d over the past 150 years, some things remain the same, which is you need great people talking to each other, networking and when we took a little while ago the decision to move here, it was for very simple reason. we understood that director kelly was not willing to move the whole qb3 do richmond. [ laughter ] as a consequence we wanted to have our scientists in the midst of wonderful, very inspiring campus. however, we never really gave up on the idea of getting creative young people, young start-ups to us. and this is now happening today. establishing the collaborator will mean that we'll attract young companies working together with us on a great campus, getting i
near the museum and the california academy of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30
of sciences opened in 2008, it quickly became one of the top tourist magnets in the city. part of the cal academies' astronomical success is the weekly nightlife party. >> i am joined by helen, who is here to school me on all the nocturnal activities that are getting ready to take place here. tell us a little about what we can expect to see at nightlife. >> we open up the doors every thursday night at the california academy of sciences. there are certain things you can see every week you can go to the museum, visit the planetarium, and we bring in bars and a deejay or band. it is a different feel from during the day, something different every week. tonight , we have beer and music. -- tonight we have great beer and music. it is beer week. we have a dozen local brewers in african hall. we have a deejays to set up throughout the museum and a live performance at 9:00 p.m. tonight. >> what has been your favorite part as a participant or as an observer? >> my favorite part is to walk around the aquarium in to see people with a drink in their hands, getting to know maybe somebody new, may be lo
for biological purposes, evolutionary purposes, for kids. it is also great for science. if we can get an age out of this mastadon, a mammoth columbi, we will get an age and plug the data into the paleoclimate graphs we have. we have a lot of sea level fluctuations already recorded that. gives us information. we can tie this into a sea level curve of sea level lows, which reflect ice cages and global warmings throughout 600 million years. we use those data to project to the future of what the earth has naturally been doing. it is also good for -- age dates are incredibly important for all walks of geology. we use them to figure out how old young units are. if they are cut by a fault, we know the fault happened and the seismicity occurred after the unit was deposited. if we get an age we can say when. everyone is asking when the next big one will be. based on our recurrence interval based on earthquakes from ages of things like this, we can have a potential hypothesis when the next earthquake will be, based on the fossil finds. it is great for everybody. this is original so we can probably get a
the arts and sciences. there is luther burbank and jack london. there was a thing on the side. it says federal art project and has beginning and ending date. that is a wall which becomes a tomb stone. the artists themselves are becoming ghosts. that's what he's doing there. joseph danish. head of the projects, it is it was a wonderful time that he woke up every morning wondering how long it would last. they were being paid to produce public art. well, what happened of course is the war. the war came along. and roosevelt could see it coming. so, very few people understand the new deal segways into war. they beefed up the military bases like fort mason. my 1943, they are all killed. the war did what the new deal couldn't do, full employment. there were reports, it's still with mind numbing statistic. we have to rely on other people to do it. the these projects enriched the lives of millions of people and does so today all the time. i have become aware of it, but very few people are. i have also become aware extraordinary people. here's a dedication of roosevelt. on the left, who painted
it to have our public policy be guided less about compromise and more about science. [applause] and buy accurate public policy analysis, studies that show things like what are the awards reaped from investment in public funding of contraception? what do we gain from that? what are the consequences if we do not? it has been disappointing to see the ways in which science has been pushed out of so much of our legislative process. there are bills that have been enacted across the country requiring medical providers to give statements to women who are coming in for services, frequently abortion services, that are based on untrue science. that is a scary moment. regardless of how you feel about abortion and your personal or legal beliefs, to require medical professionals to mislead their patience is not where we should be as a country. those type of scientific facts and accurate analyses should be given much more credence in our political and government process than our ideology. [applause] >> i think it is fair to ask this question. i received some e-mails from constituents and others who sa
labs are opening their doors to scientists of tomorrow. abc7 health and science reporter carolyn johnson has more. >> when irene medina returned to high school this fall she had plenty of stories to tell about her summer job. >> i did my first surgery in iraq. it was interesting and exciting for me. >> instead of flipping burgers , she was helping researchers at ucsf understand brain function. it is helping newborn infants survive brain traumas and other injuries. >> i started thinking, what they are doing is something great. >> across the bay at the university of california, they were doing great science too working on a study that could some day help human muscles regenerate. >> we saw improved muscle regeneration, actually. it was interesting. >> the path into these high end labs began with internship programs from the california institute of regenerative medicine. once in the program they are assigned mentors to gather them in real life lab assignments. >> they get down to the genetic level and cellular level, and they really understand that their specific part of the project
are opening their doors to scientists of tomorrow. abc7 health and science reporter carolyn johnson has more. >> when irene medina returned to high school this fall she had plenty of stories to tell about her summer job. >> i did my first surgery in iraq. it was interesting and exciting for me. >> instead of flipping burgers , she was helping researchers at ucsf understand brain function. it is helping newborn infants survive brain traumas and other injuries. >> i started thinking, what they are doing is something great. >> across the bay at the university of california, they were doing great science too working on a study that could some day help human muscles regenerate. >> we saw improved muscle regeneration, actually. it was interesting. >> the path into these high end labs began with internship programs from the california institute of regenerative medicine. once in the program they are assigned mentors to gather them in real life lab assignments. >> they get down to the genetic level and cellular level, and they really understand that their specific part of the project including the li
if japanese tsunami debris has come aboard. ktvu's health and science editor john fowler has more. >> reporter: you can see the occasional bit of plastic on the beach but volunteers cleared beaches from santa cruz to monterey. >> reporter: in a warehouse they call the trash lab researchers went through a tiny fraction of the 8-tons volunteers picked up. >> our beaches are bees used heavily and we are still leaving stuff behind. >> shoes, socks, cans, bottles, all kinds of stuff. you name it, we can find it on the beach. >> reporter: they are on the look out for debris from the japanese sunomy. -- tsunami. >> someone was eating on the beach and left it there. >> 1.5 million tons swept out to sea from japan. officials said a dozen confirmed from japan. none in california. >> it is a big ocean. much can sink. it is phenomenal that individual items will find their ways to the shores. >> reporter: researchers were identifying dangerous stuff. >> getting a better understanding of the hazards out there. >> reporter: scientists are hoping to convince manufacturers and policy makers to protect our ocea
are three key ethical -- the first one is this. i do not think that there is any legitimate basis in science, medicine, or any ethical code that i know of or the bible, for that matter for our criminal law tdistinguishing between those wo have alcohol and tobacco and people who put other substances in their body. there is no legitimate basis for distinguishing between the alcoholic on the one hand under criminal law and between the drug addict on the other. that is first. the second ethical point is i hope most of you agree with this. i do not believe that anybody should be punished simply for what we put into our own bodies absent harm to others. nobody deserves to be punished for what we put in our bodies absent harm to others. hurt somebody, yes and not tell me your addiction was the excuse. we need to be regarded as sovereign over our minds and bodies. the criminal law should not be treating anyone as a criminal for what we put in here. when one is trying to pursue a particular public health or public safety objective, reducing the harm of drugs or whatever it might be. and when you have
off the race to the top, let's hire 100,000 new math and science teachers who are actually trained in math and science. let's continue to focus on early childhood education, makes a big difference for kids who are particularly low income. part of the race to the top let's figure out what are the dropout factors out there. a couple thousand schools where we know they are really underperforming and let's transform those schools. >> in the state of the union you said i'm putting you on notices, colleges, if you don't reduce this tuition, you don't see your funding dropped. is there any evidence that they have done anything to changed? that they have listened to that threat? >> there are some schools that we have. the biggest problem that we have with tuition, especially at public universities, is state legislatures have been shifting priorities, and what we've said to state legislatures is you've got to do your part and prioritize this because how well your state does is going to depend on how good -- how well your work force is educated, but what we've also seen is schools starting t
to take free rides. >> today we're looking at science fiction becoming tomorrow's reality. >> governor brown visited google headquarters in mountain view to sign a bill into law that brings a driverless cars are one step closer to the roads. [ male announcer ] citibank's app for ipad makes it easy for anne to manage her finances when she's on the go. even when she's not going anywhere. citibank for ipad. easier banking. standard at citibank. [ male announcer ] jay likes it when his mobile phone helps him deposit his checks. jay also like it when mother nature helps him wash his car. mother nature's cool like that. mobile check deposit. easier banking. standard at citibank. the >>pam: here is a look at our top stories. fbi investigators say to an area where human remains were found. it is the connection with the speed freak tellers case. investigators found thousands of human bone fragments earlier this year. at this point, digging for more human bones has not started. >>pam: it shooting happened around 3:00 in oakland. police are still trying to find out who fired the dozens of shots
'll be a long two years. >>> today we are looking at science fiction becoming tomorrow's reality. the airwaves driverless cars get the green light in california was one of the smartest people in the bay area says the roads will be safer. >>> 40 million fans can't be wrong. the guilty pleasure that have bay area women's waiting in line for hours tonight. ,, why shop t.j.maxx and marshalls? one. you get all the awesome brand names. two. you get them for less than department stores, and that's awesome. three. she'll think you look stylish and awesome. four. you'll actually be awesome, which is awesome. getting taken a look at the chaos up falling apart malfunction on september 16th. this surveillance video from the civic center when a train experienced what part is calling 8,000 v electrical arc caused by some degree on the track that is what are now says caused the bright flash and all that smoke as you can see it sent people scrambling. cars that donated driver. it's officially endorsed by california law. more on the technology some google employees are already using to go for work. today we'r
to a degree to scientific certainty, we hope the science is correct and the damage isn't what we think because obviously nobody wants to poison people, that's not the intent here, but based on was the acceptable science around what we know about this particular particulates, the environmental review did address them. we may not agree on what was lt+ hink ;bqp+mkwqk; understand that the technology on turf is getting better so there's new kinds of substances that are detrimental, we'll see more in time, but there's no way to mitigate environmental risks, there's always pollutants and arsenic in so much of our ecosystem and it's hard to know how much is a real problem, so i just wanted to address the appellant's concerns. >> thank you. >> is there a motion from the commissioners? >> commissioner borden? >> i move to uphold the pmd and deny the appeal fm >> second. >> commissioners, the motion on the floor is for upholding the prelim nation negative declaration thereby deny thing appeal on that motion, commissioner antonini? >> aye. >> commissioner borden? >> aye. >> commissioner moore? >> aye. >>
is unpredictable. ktvu's health and science editor john fowler is live in brentwood where west nile is worse than it was last year. john? >> reporter: they are expected here in about 40 minutes to prepare for the fogging tonight. officials said west nile virus shows no sign of slowing. >> reporter: our camera was there as a technician found mosquitos in this pool behind a vacant house. >> the warmer weather kept west nile virus still going. we are getting reports. >> reporter: another bird testing positive today. frozen for further analysis. 66% higher than last year. and the fraction of mosquitos with the virus, four times higher. again, it is warm weather. >> they lay eggs more quickly, grow more quickly. it causes the virus to produce more quickly. >> reporter: positive mosquitos, in the eastern part of the county. two human cases, nationwide 130 dead. 3100 sick. millions infected who don't know it. the human risk is low, it is hard to prove a human vaccine effected. >> there is no way to know they will end up being exposed to west nile. >> reporter: it is up to us to protect our selves. treat
per year. >> if we bonded and are able to learn together and making tun while in the science fair together. >> there are together saving tens of thousands in energy costs. something the class never had to worry about. >> it's baby steps you have to lead to what we have to do there is every light switch counts. >> this is about one and a half inches in diameter. >> they know it best. they can help us out with information. >> this was made possible by pg&e pilot program. there are teamed with those who know campus best. students of green engineer academy. >> that is about 100,000 savings which is i think $14,000 for the school. >> students able to identify 45 lampes and thermostats and old computers outindicate dated and sucking up too much energy to be cost effective. there is a move the district officer can appreciate. >> this is just like $70,000 for a small investment. we do have to pay money to save money. but the return is short. >> when there is the best part unless the school is new, every school has an opportunity to save as much in energy costs. >> and there is hands on tr
that they can come and take culinary classes and get jobs in a restaurant industry, a number of computer science classes here will get you a job at twitter, zynga. >> officials here have until october 15th to submit an action plan aimed at turning around city college. in san francisco rob ross, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> california's community college system is getting a new leader. gab rice paris is named the next over state's 112 campus system. he'll replace jack who retired this month. paris previously led the reno community college district in sacramento area. make up the nation's largest public college system. >>> over at uc berkeley citizen union workers held a rally today in support of five campus who have been laid off. the building they were assigned to were being demolished. they were denied the opportunity to transfer to other open positions. the university tells ktvu it is work wg the custodians to help find them similar jobs but they need to apply to different departments like any other campus employee. >>> the national hockey league announced today it is canceling the entire preseaso
at science fiction becoming tomorrow's reality. >> governor brown visited the google headquarters to sign a bill that allows a global driverless cars one step closer to our roads. >>pam: a few other new laws signed today. a new plan for state parks in the wake of plant closures and the scandal. those stories and more coming up at 5:30 p.m.. [ laughter ] [ girl ] wow. you guys have it easy. i wish i had u-verse when i was your age. in my day, we didn't have these fancy wireless receivers. blah, blah, blah. if i had a sleepover, i couldn't just move the tv into the playroom. no, we had to watch movies in the den because that's where the tv outlet was. and if dad was snoring on the couch, we muscled through it. is she for real? your generation has it made. [ male announcer ] the wireless receiver. only from at&t u-verse. get a free wireless receiver with a qualifying u-verse plan. rethink possible. >>dan: we are following breaking this tonight, reggie kumar is live on the scene in oakland where a pregnant woman was injured in a shooting. >>reggie: we're hearing reports that a pregnant wom
the early stock numbers. de me what i am today. our science teacher helped us build it. ♪ now i'm a geologist at chevron, and i get to help science teachers. it has four servo motors and a wireless microcontroller. over the last three years we've put nearly 100 million dollars into american education. that's thousands of kids learning to love science. ♪ isn't that cool? and that's pretty cool. ♪ isn't that cool? and that's pretty cool. i like to score my designer shoes and handbags early. so i shop at t.j.'s. i get my favorite brands without having to wait for them to go on sale someplace else. done! fashion direct from designers. savings direct to you. t.j.maxx. to meet the needs of my growing business. but how am i going to fund it? and i have to find a way to manage my cash flow better. [ female announcer ] our wells fargo bankers are here to listen, offer guidance and provide you with options tailored to your business. we've loaned more money to small businesses than any other bank for ten years running. so come talk to us to see how we can help. wells fargo. together we
is a film called "looper," the science fiction film that just played toronto that i just got back from. it's a really wonderful film with joseph gordon-levitt and bruce willis. i really hope people take a chance on it, 'cause it's a lot of fun, a lot of great action, and a lot of great ideas, which we don't have in movies these days. > > i have to tell you, i am very much enjoying the movie trailer to "won't back down." > > it kind of looks like an oscar contender doesn't it? just the way it's got viola davis, maggie gyllenhaal- > > two good actresses. > > yeah, but, you know, fox is not, they didn't really put this movie in the film festivals, so they're just kind of quietly releasing it here at the end of september. it has the look and feel of an oscar contender, but i really don't hold a whole lot of hope out for it. > > so september just kind of a month ... > > something we can write off. there's going to be some better stuff next month we can talk about. > > we will see you next month. that's erik childress, he is vice-president of the chicago film critics' association, joins us every
, science and language arts and coached. the principal received word of the incident monday and informed the middle school and district headquarters. >> we made a report to the police department monday evening. subsequently, an investigation is ensuing. it is my understanding that the teacher was arrested. >> reporter: the man who had been teaching monday was arrested at his home yesterday morning. the alleged victim described as former student. he was very popular with students. >> arrested mr. i? what! >> reporter: some parents are in disbelief. >> i hope it is not true. my daughter adored him. he was a great teacher. i lived her all my life, i know him as a student myself. >> reporter: students are being offered counseling. the superintendent says izumizaki's record was clean and performance above average. >> we hire credentialled teachers thoroughly fingerprinted. we do reference checks. everything that we can do. >> reporter: mr. izumizaki is being held on $100,000 bail. he's scheduled to make his first court appears tomorrow afternoon. there's a meeting scheduled here in the librar
in the department of exercise and sports science. i think it is a good match for me to be demonstrating the wii, which is a good physical activity. i am joined on the stage by a student, not from usf, but from san francisco state. we actually talk to each other. this is mackenna. >> good morning. >> finally, i am joined by alicia from the independent living center in san francisco. it is great for all of you to be here today. people will be trickling in over the next half hour. we will give you a taste of what wii is like. we have set up the game. i will start by playing mackeena in a game of tennis. the interesting thing about wii is we use this little remote. just by moving our arms, we can control movement on the screen. you will be watching up on the big screen as we play a game of tennis. are you ready? all right. we will select two players. that is me. does that look like me? it kind of those -- of does. does that look like mackenna? that is not by chance. you can make the person look like anything you want. they can even look like aliens. interesting. we are going to play some great tenn
>>> today on mosaic we're going to talk about science. and i guess the canon lawyer with the archdiocese of san francisco will have to speak for himself. are you insane? >>> i'm working on its. >>> that is kind of the hope of the charge that will all work towards holiness. >>> the church has seats in which you think would be an opening good dialogue about sainthood canonization and what people it chosen to be saints what would be a good place to start? a >>> since i've been around long before there were canonized an officially recognized by the church we are are called to holiness that's the fundamental part of the christian life and the church missing a value in making these people recognized and bring them to the christian faith as models and place before recess people commit called upon for intercession. the zero aspects of sainthood that we will get into. >>> when we talk about canonization it is to be inscribed in the canons of the church. to be in the church for ever. >>> there's a book called the roman martyrology the official book that has all of the le
. >> there is science now we didn't have before. that sexual orientation is not something that can be changed. >> but the victory may be short lived and there are groups that already claim it's unconstitutional violating first amendment. >> this is absolutely clamps down on speech by professionals involved and also affects the minors and their parents rights to access types of therapies they may want. >> legal groups also argue conversion therapy does work for people. >> when this benefits people, and may or may not benefit other people there is no basis for the state to step in. >> this is among the darkest times of my life? >> did it work? >> no. i am just as gay as i ever was. >> other states will be interested in seeing how this case plays out. they, too are considering the ban autos there is a busy weekend ahead. there a look at options this weekend. >> and there is a killer whale in sea world with a injury what. trainers say could have caused this massive wound. >> and this is the rover seeing unusually have you heard of the new dialing procedure for the 408 and 669 area codes? no, what
viewed more than 4- 1/2 million times. in the video he says evolution is fundamental to all life science and parents should not encourage children to reject it. he produced this in response to efforts to present bible stories as a alternative to evolution in public schools. >>> a turn for a big rig accident. the driver lost control of a 18 wheeler filled with beer. it happened yesterday in downtown. the driver took the exit too fast that caused the rig to flip. it doesn't appear the driver was under the influence. >>> a condition called zombie bees has been discovered in washington. it causes bees to fly at night and lurch till they die. a bee keeper in washington found the first bees in that state. a biologist in san francisco discovered them in california in 2008. he uses a website to track it across the country. >>> mayor ed lee alawed the commission on -- applauded the commission on domestic violence. mayor ed lee said the commission helped cut domestic violence homicides by 80% and he promised to improve those numbers even more. >> to keep that work up. to keep the issues in front o
, african-american, latino, islanders specifically were not given those classes, integrated science or integrated math which could get you to graduation, but could never get you to college. that a through g graduation requirement gave them access, so, that's one fabulous thing about this graduation requirement. the other thing is it gives them opportunity. quite frankly, d or better gives them no opportunity. a d or better says will not get them into college. a d or better. and quite frankly it's even cs and d at some colleges. so, d or better is actually not an adequate, i think, level to say that we have graduated with all fairness, have graduated our students prepared to college or a job because d or better is not prepared for college or a job. so, as a board i think if we're going to be looking at this graduation requirement should it be c or better or d or better. we're giving the numbers for both to see how much work we have to do. i think you can see on the chart even with the d or better we have much, much more work to do. this talks with black migration, african-american mi
robotic claw. my high school science teacher made me what i am today. our science teacher helped us build it. ♪ now i'm a geologist at chevron, and i get to help science teachers. it has four servo motors and a wireless microcontroller. over the last three years we've put nearly 100 million dollars into american education. that's thousands of kids learning to love science. ♪ isn't that cool? and that's pretty cool. ♪ isn't that cool? and that's pretty cool. sleep train's inveis ending soon. sale save 10%, 20%, even 35% on a huge selection of simmons and sealy clearance mattresses. get 2 years interest-free financing on tempur-pedic. even get free delivery! sleep train stacks the savings high to keep the prices low. but hurry, the inventory clearance sale is ending soon. superior service, best selection, lowest price, guaranteed. ♪ sleep train ♪ your ticket to a better night's sleep ♪ 7:16 a.m. and take a look at the weather elsewhere. there's a twist so yesterday. it rips through a small town that was outside of st. louis. it brought strong winds that were strong enough to blo
information that i am reporting on. i mean it's 400 pages of science, new discoveries of -- that should be changing the way we think about women and arousal and helping us understand that men's and women's sexual responses are not the same. just conventional wisdom that we are talk in from 40 years ago there is this amazing new neuroscience that shows there is a brain gentleman va gina vagina connection that people may be upset about not my leaders they are thrilled to learn more about themselves. the data explains why 30% of women report low sexual desire and another 30% some of the same well, some different, say that they don't reach orgasm when they want to. even in a hyper sexual icedized society. this is t*s not working for not working for women but this explains why. >> gavin: you are working around the mind vagina connection about, how is that controversial? it connects -- >> it's so funny, i wrote a book called misconceptions about the birthing industry which documented to understand of data on the brai
issues. gang violence and brain science and crime, these are issues at the forefront and deserve all of our attention. this is a greatat>> your going p with me because i liked to wander around and see faces. you have learned more about me that a lot of people know. for the last 10 years i have been married to someone who was a deputy chief of the lapd and i now refer to him as being in recovery. at the same time, i have been working extensively with home with industries, and my brother said, if he had dreamed i would be married to a policeman and working with a priest, somebody would be lying. i have been working with gangs and been involved with gangs, trying to figure them out for 34 years. i began as a young social worker in south los angeles. with gang infested housing projects that are now almost mythic, jordan downs and nickerson gardens, and i worked in these projects during what is referred to as the decade of death, when crack and unregulated gun availability laid waste to communities of color. in los angeles during the late 1980's and early 1990's, there were 1000 homicides
nobody is behind the wheel. >> today we are looking at science fiction becoming reality. >> the fine the notion, and governor jerry brown arrived at google in a self driving a car to accelerate california's leadership in autonomous vehicles. google has already logged 300,000 mi. with this technology. a new law allows them on public roads for testing as long as a licensed and insured drivers behind the wheel. the governor signed legislation in front of an audience of google employees. a google co-founder was asked when the public might get their hands on it >> we have some pretty ambitious targets for the team, they are stressed out looking at me answer this question >> he did say five years or less into believes it will save lives. 99 percent of all traffics in fatal accidents are caused by human error >> i suspect it will be far safer than human driven cars >> it also opens up the possibility of the blind people driving. cutting down on congestion, these cars automatically align themselves with precision and allow people to do something else while driving. who gets the ticket in a s
growth and in our history. the next is science given at grades five, eight and ten. you see the same double digit trend with the district moving from 51.2 to 51.6. and as i said when we look we have three lenses in which we look at these scores. the first is over time. the second is movement. looking at the same group of students that took the test two ears in a row and how did they move in their proficiency level? so we had matched scores for 30,000 students. and when they began the year last year they came in at 60.4 percent proficiency and by the end of the year 62.7 or 63% of them were profishtd. looking at all the proficiency levels and how students moved we found the movement to be around 16.6 percent or 70% to round it which means seven out of every ten students either remained profirkt or advanced or moved up one level. okay. i'm going to repeat that. seven out of every ten students either remained proficient and advanced or moved up a level. in math we found the movement to
may sound like science fiction but google headquarters where engineers are working to make the dream a reality. explains a new and modernized of the road. >> perhaps the drive point governor jerry brown arrived today at google headquarters toyota. he then went inside and signed a law clearing the way for driverless cars to hit the road. >> self driving car is another step forward in this long march of california pioneering the future and leading not just the country, the whole world. >> the new law will set standards including requiring a human being to be behind the wheel in case of an emergency, but that may eventually change according to google cofounder. >> you can have a car drop you off at work, get out, walk through a little bit of space, and it goes off and takes somebody else somewhere else. >> he says driverless cars may enable large car sharing and potentially reduce the demand for parking. engineers say driverless cars will not be subject to what most automobile crashes, human error. >> i expect going to be far safer than human-driven cars. >> judging by a reaction, some
. >>> of today we are looking at science fiction becoming tomorrow's reality. in a self driving car to accelerate california's leadership in the vehicles. google has already launched 300,000 mi. of the technology. and new law allows the of and it allows them to sign legislation in front of an audience of googled employees. the co-founder was asked when the public might get their hands on this vehicle? he said we have some pretty ambitious targets you can see them being stressed and answer this question. >>> but he did say five years are less and he believes it will save lives. 90% of fatal accidents are caused by human error. >>> i expect that self driving cars are going to be safer. with its cameras in scanning laser it also opens up the possibility of blind driving cutting down on congestion as self driving cars automatically align themselves and allowing people to do something else while technically driving. which brings up the question who is the ticket itself driving a car is off parking itself and no one is inside but it runs a red lights. will work that out. this may be the easiest prob
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 154 (some duplicates have been removed)

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